The New York Times

The New York Times

@nytimes

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Joined on March 02, 2007
Statistics

We looked inside some of the tweets by @nytimes and here's what we found interesting.

Inside 100 Tweets

Time between tweets:
8 minutes
Average replies
22
Average retweets
88
Average likes
293
Tweets with photos
30 / 100
Tweets with videos
0 / 100
Tweets with links
0 / 100

Rankings (sorted by number of followers)

1. in category Daily News

1. in country United States and category Daily News

1. in country United States and category Media

5. in category Media

15. in country United States

24. worldwide

The arrest of an activist in Arizona at a Black Lives Matter protest shows that despite all the victories immigrant rights activists have claimed in recent years, they are far from achieving their version of justice they are fighting for. https://t.co/9fxdYSdU69

Virtual Harvard hits different. https://t.co/3Rl4BCcMcB

Tiffany May
41 minutes ago

K-pop groups reach across cultural boundaries to find new muses but are simultaneously stumbling over cultural and racial red lines. Fans are holding them to account, and getting quick results. With @esuhyuni + @YonetteJo edits https://t.co/b4fkSO27FP

Colombia, y América Latina en general, estaba en proceso de una transformación crucial: la desigualdad había caído a su punto histórico más bajo. Hablamos con decenas de personas en el país que temen que la pandemia pueda revertir por completo ese avance. https://t.co/TeZixGWxyc

Experts in Colombia say the pandemic could set the fight against inequality back 2 decades. One teacher in Medellín put it more simply: she fears her students from struggling families are "losing their vision" of a better future. Read our full story: https://t.co/A7yPjPqf3F

But perhaps the most glaring sign of Latin America's backslide can be seen on the highways. Mile after mile, there are processions of Venezuelan migrants leaving Colombia for the collapsing nation they once fled. Authorities say they number over 80,000 since the pandemic began. https://t.co/bQIRQQsbjP

But perhaps the most glaring sign of Latin America's backslide can be seen on the highways. Mile after mile, there are processions of Venezuelan migrants leaving Colombia for the collapsing nation they once fled. Authorities say they number over 80,000 since the pandemic began. https://t.co/bQIRQQsbjP

In El Rosal, there was David Aguirre, 32, once a low-level bodyguard who poured his life savings into a strawberry farm that opened a few months before the pandemic. When he met with reporters, he'd just had to kill off 1/4 of his crop, unable to find buyers or pay his workers. https://t.co/cMWofUOJsv

In El Rosal, there was David Aguirre, 32, once a low-level bodyguard who poured his life savings into a strawberry farm that opened a few months before the pandemic. When he met with reporters, he'd just had to kill off 1/4 of his crop, unable to find buyers or pay his workers. https://t.co/cMWofUOJsv

And in Cúcuta, the economic fallout of the pandemic has forced many young girls into sex work. Someone had to bring in money, explained one 17-year-old girl whose father lost his construction job, "and it turned to me." https://t.co/A7yPjPqf3F

Quoted @julieturkewitz

I could not get the clattering out of my head. Sandra is a housekeeper in Colombia who lost her job because of the pandemic. Here she is being evicted for the second time in the short course of the health crisis. https://t.co/EGfPAyMgLZ

In Bogotá, they met Sandra Abello, who had grown up scrubbing floors but was proud to finally have a home in a decent neighborhood. When the pandemic hit, she had to move her family into an illegal shed. Her daughter called it the "great regression." https://t.co/JOtqYcbZwo

Quoted @julieturkewitz

We wanted to know what was happening to the families that had been so central to that march toward equality. So we began to drive. (Battery died just once.) https://t.co/L9EHsw7U3R

We wanted to know what was happening to the families that had been so central to that march toward equality. So we began to drive. (Battery died just once.) https://t.co/L9EHsw7U3R

Our reporters @JulieTurkewitz and Sofía Villamil, with the photojournalist @FedericoRios, traveled 1,000 miles across Colombia to document this critical moment and ask dozens of people how the pandemic was changing the course of their lives. https://t.co/mxSsot0pwj

Not long ago, Colombia — and Latin America more broadly — was in the middle of a history-making transformation: Inequality had fallen to its lowest point on record. The pandemic could potentially reverse that and upend entire societies for years to come. https://t.co/A7yPjPqf3F

Weekend plans: Making ice cream at home. Really. Get some flavor and mix-in ideas here: https://t.co/9QVXyLyChH https://t.co/41o27IX2VN

Weekend plans: Making ice cream at home. Really. Get some flavor and mix-in ideas here: https://t.co/9QVXyLyChH https://t.co/41o27IX2VN

We wrote about Dr. Lorna Breen, the E.R. doctor who died by suicide. She was brilliant, compassionate, unflappable. The coronavirus turned her ER into a brutal battleground. This is what happened during her final weeks of life. https://t.co/oS3FUmF51r

As President Trump’s poll numbers slide, some Democrats are urging Joe Biden to go big, and try for states like Texas. So far, he’s being cautious. https://t.co/CxxLm9D9OD

Parts of the country are reckoning with the word plantation in city and development names. In Plantation, Fla., Mr. Auguste is leading the charge to rename his city. "We have to be more than not racist — we have to be antiracist," he told me and his mayor. https://t.co/QNfIDV3ncu

1. Teachers are organizing into a national movement to demand schools stay closed until strict safety measures are in place or the virus is under control. They say they do not feel safe or listened to. And Trump’s intervention has deepened their anger. https://t.co/yXz7T16psD

In Print This Weekend: 29 authors. 29 short stories. Read @NYTmag's The Decameron Project, an entire issue of new, original fiction. https://t.co/ReupXxWUTa https://t.co/pqfH5CTy75

In Print This Weekend: 29 authors. 29 short stories. Read @NYTmag's The Decameron Project, an entire issue of new, original fiction. https://t.co/ReupXxWUTa https://t.co/pqfH5CTy75

One of Dr. Breen’s friends said their last conversation has become especially crushing: At one point, Dr. Breen had gotten stuck on a thought and kept repeating herself. https://t.co/KmtAp2TVP2 https://t.co/zAFSGx8WOd

One of Dr. Breen’s friends said their last conversation has become especially crushing: At one point, Dr. Breen had gotten stuck on a thought and kept repeating herself. https://t.co/KmtAp2TVP2 https://t.co/zAFSGx8WOd

Emergency physicians are asked to be saviors. During the global coronavirus crisis, expectations of bravery have only mounted. Dr. Breen’s story exposes the trauma that doctors comfortably diagnose, but are reluctant to personally reveal. https://t.co/KmtAp2TVP2

Dr. Breen’s family and friends believe she was haunted by the number of people she could not save. She was devastated that she had suffered a breakdown when the city was desperate for heroes. And she was certain her career would not survive it. https://t.co/KmtAp2TVP2 https://t.co/fihJBEegMK

Dr. Breen’s family and friends believe she was haunted by the number of people she could not save. She was devastated that she had suffered a breakdown when the city was desperate for heroes. And she was certain her career would not survive it. https://t.co/KmtAp2TVP2 https://t.co/fihJBEegMK

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