Wellcome Collection

Wellcome Collection

@ExploreWellcome

Followers75K
Following2.2K

The free museum and library that aims to challenge how we all think and feel about health by connecting science, medicine, life and art.

London, UK
Joined on June 18, 2009
Statistics

We looked inside some of the tweets by @ExploreWellcome and here's what we found interesting.

Inside 100 Tweets

Time between tweets:
a day
Average replies
1
Average retweets
16
Average likes
34
Tweets with photos
32 / 100
Tweets with videos
5 / 100
Tweets with links
0 / 100

Rankings (sorted by number of followers)

36. in country United Kingdom and category Cultural center

92. in country United Kingdom and category Place

227. in category Cultural center

898. in category Place

In this extract Booker Prize-nominated novelist and activist @Elif_Safak makes an uplifting plea for conscious optimism, reflecting on how hard it is to be heard, but how listening can nurture wisdom, connection and empathy. https://t.co/7doPnCt0PW

In these days of social distancing, Barack Obama’s former Surgeon General, @vivek_murthy looks at loneliness and the importance of human connection, exploring the fundamental question; how can we stay together while keeping apart? https://t.co/XEXcvMl4v2

We're making some upgrades to our systems this evening! The library catalogue will be unavailable for about 2 hours from 17.00. https://t.co/WUguUvbglS

The legacy of Edward Jenner, father of modern vaccination, has never felt more relevant as nations campaign together for a free, universally accessible Covid-19 vaccine. Owen Gower @DrJennersHouse reminds us of Jenner's remarkable skill and vision. https://t.co/zptbGDzPJ7

My interest in #histPublicHealth & in disability history overlap in this piece for @ExploreWellcome where I examine how public health poster campaigns often used ableist anxieties about disability to get across their messages. #DisHist #histmed https://t.co/8XJvqy45ip

Public health campaigns often represent disability as the tragic outcome of failing to prevent disease by following health recommendations. Aparna Nair looks at how such campaigns perpetuate prejudice against disabled people and are guilty of ableism. https://t.co/zSmIAR1xW5

Aged 14 to 19? Join our FREE empowering online discussion this Thursday where we'll be looking at pay-what-you-can cafés, racial bias in AI technology, and what ‘sustainable’ fashion really means. https://t.co/m41zlsEOp0

In the sixth and final episode of his coronavirus podcast, @markthomasinfo speaks to health and care workers about their hopes and fears for the future as well as new treatments, mental health crises and second surges. https://t.co/PYsjwY0nX0

'You don't need to be a traveller to have multiple belongings.'

The brilliant @Elif_Safak was the latest guest on the @Waterstones podcast, talking about division - and unity - with @iwilltweet.

Listen in on their conversation: https://t.co/nuB50HmWUH https://t.co/thvEZKj3sN

'You don't need to be a traveller to have multiple belongings.' The brilliant @Elif_Safak was the latest guest on the @Waterstones podcast, talking about division - and unity - with @iwilltweet. Listen in on their conversation: https://t.co/nuB50HmWUH https://t.co/thvEZKj3sN

From the miniature adult in the womb imagined by 15th-century artists to the increasing detail of today’s ultrasound scans, Tania McIntosh traces our changing view of the human foetus. https://t.co/YEoBPf2hX8

In the fifth episode of his coronavirus podcast, @markthomasinfo considers coping and resilience, talking to health workers about how they’re weathering a storm like COVID-19. https://t.co/wDTTl8q0Sj

'Sharp and elegant... [a] calm and generous view of the world' It's publication week for @Elif_Safak's How to Stay Sane in an Age of Division. Here's @wmarybeard's review of the @guardian's Book of the Day: https://t.co/mlYVwX3qYr

From douches to diaphragms, and condoms to caps, discover the wide range of contraception methods people have used over the centuries. https://t.co/rulkmnpvUX

What are some of your favourite posters that deal with disease? Have you spotted any local posters encouraging us to behave ourselves? Share your favourites with us!

This US poster from the 1940s adopts satire as a route to influencing behaviour, giving people 'helpful' advice on all the things they *should* do...if they want to catch flu and die before their time. https://t.co/1eQ6MM3SEx

This US poster from the 1940s adopts satire as a route to influencing behaviour, giving people 'helpful' advice on all the things they *should* do...if they want to catch flu and die before their time. https://t.co/1eQ6MM3SEx

'Hands, face, space' is the newest snappy slogan from government to help us remember how to behave during the pandemic. While descriptive, it's perhaps not as memorable as the catchy rhyme 'coughs and sneezes spread diseases', a slogan from the 1940s that we still say today. 🤧 https://t.co/lOCMoOrB7v

'Hands, face, space' is the newest snappy slogan from government to help us remember how to behave during the pandemic. While descriptive, it's perhaps not as memorable as the catchy rhyme 'coughs and sneezes spread diseases', a slogan from the 1940s that we still say today. 🤧 https://t.co/lOCMoOrB7v

These posters from the 1940s were produced in a bid to stem outbreaks of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One uses the image of a glamorous woman to warn against the dangers of promiscuity, while the other shows a soldier who has been infected with a STI while on furlough. https://t.co/L8xLCwyR84

These posters from the 1940s were produced in a bid to stem outbreaks of sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). One uses the image of a glamorous woman to warn against the dangers of promiscuity, while the other shows a soldier who has been infected with a STI while on furlough. https://t.co/L8xLCwyR84

Some posters used grotesque and potent imagery, utilising fear as a means to encourage behavioural change. These not-so-subtle examples dating from 1919 and 1977, respectively, warn against ticks (to prevent the spread of typhus) and importing dogs (to prevent rabies). 😨 https://t.co/KqvjFvcGoJ

Some posters used grotesque and potent imagery, utilising fear as a means to encourage behavioural change. These not-so-subtle examples dating from 1919 and 1977, respectively, warn against ticks (to prevent the spread of typhus) and importing dogs (to prevent rabies). 😨 https://t.co/KqvjFvcGoJ

One of our oldest posters is from 17th century Italy. Like early Coronavirus posters, it suggested who was at risk based on geography. This one stated that plague was suspected as being in the towns of Cortabio, Primaluna, Introibo, Alba, Diano, Ceva, Ginevra and Cluse. https://t.co/eovWGrtX70

One of our oldest posters is from 17th century Italy. Like early Coronavirus posters, it suggested who was at risk based on geography. This one stated that plague was suspected as being in the towns of Cortabio, Primaluna, Introibo, Alba, Diano, Ceva, Ginevra and Cluse. https://t.co/eovWGrtX70

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